Dr Sadlon's Dental Blog

Posts for: June, 2012

By Sadlon Dentistry
June 23, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   oral health   brushing  
ToothBrushingDontOverdoIt

It is important to brush your teeth every day to remove plaque (that sticky white film, composed of bacteria, on your teeth near your gums), but it is possible to overdo it — particularly if you find that your teeth are becoming sensitive to hot and cold or to variations in pressure.

Brushing your teeth too hard or too many times per day can aggravate tooth sensitivity, which can range from a mild twinge to a severe pain. You can accomplish the goal of tooth brushing — plaque removal — by using a soft brush with a very gentle action. Repeated aggressive brushing with a hard brush is not required and can even be harmful to your teeth and gums.

To understand how teeth become sensitive, you need to know about the internal structure of your teeth. Teeth are covered by enamel, a hard mineralized coating that protects them from changes in temperature and pressure. If the enamel is worn away, it exposes the next lower layer of the tooth, the dentin. The dentin is a living tissue containing nerve fibers that connect to the nerves in the tooth's root.

Excessive tooth brushing can irritate your gums and cause them to shrink away from your teeth, particularly if you have thin gum tissues. The thickness or thinness of your gum tissues is something you inherit from your parents, so you can't change it. Hard brushing can begin to wear away the enamel covering of your teeth. Exposure to acids or sugars in the foods you eat and drink can continue the damage.

Acidic foods and drinks such as fruit juices dissolve some of the minerals in your teeth by a process called “demineralization.” Fortunately, your saliva can interact with the enamel and bring back minerals that are leaving the tooth's surface. This process is called “remineralization.” It is important to let your healthy saliva wash your teeth's surfaces for a while before brushing so that dissolved minerals get a chance to be returned to your enamel. It takes between twelve and twenty-four hours for plaque to form on your teeth, so you don't need to brush more than twice a day.

The best way to make sure you are brushing your teeth properly is to have us evaluate your brushing technique at your next dental appointment. We will be able to tell you whether you need to change the angle of your brush or the pressure you are applying for the most effective removal of plaque with the least wear on your teeth and gums. Tooth brushing serves an important purpose, but remember that you can actually have too much of a good thing.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about tooth brushing and oral hygiene. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sensitive Teeth.”


TheMagicBehindProfessionalTeethWhitening

Whitening your teeth is an easy way for most people to achieve a brighter, more appealing smile. And for older adults, it can also contribute to a more youthful appearance. We are often asked how our tooth whitening products and services stack up when compared to the many over-the-counter (OTC) products available at discount and drug stores. The following are some key facts to understand about teeth whitening so that you can receive the results you want.

What is the real difference between professional products and ones I can buy over-the-counter?

Whether you purchase over-the-counter whitening strips, toothpaste, mouthrinses, or “paint on” tooth whitening products, you are basically receiving the same product, but with a lower concentration of carbamide peroxide, the chemical responsible for teeth whitening. And while some of the products may contain a slightly higher concentration of this solution, they all are under strict governmental guidelines for ensuring you experience little to no side-effects as long as you follow the instructions. However, with our bleaching products and services, you are under the care of a trained professional and thus can receive much higher concentrations without compromising your health or the health of your teeth. This fact means that under our care you can achieve more dramatic results faster.

How long will the results last?

Bleaching is not a permanent solution; thus, your results will diminish over a six-month to one year period of time. However, it doesn't take much to touch up or maintain your white smile in a single visit, or with custom-made whitening trays that we can provide for home use. You can also keep your brighter smile a little longer by avoiding food that stains your teeth. And when drinking coffee, tea, cola, wine and other drinks like these, sip them using a straw so that they are less likely to discolor your teeth.

Is bleaching safe for my teeth?

We pride ourselves on providing and promoting optimal oral healthcare and thus would never offer any products or services that are unsafe. Additionally, there are numerous studies supporting the overall safety of whitening your teeth. We are careful to avoid sensitivity, which is an occasional side effect of intensive bleaching, and we suggest protecting the teeth with fluoride.

Want to learn more?

Contact us today to discuss your questions or to schedule an appointment. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor article, “Teeth Whitening: Brighter, Lighter, Whiter....”


By Sadlon Dentistry
June 07, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: denture  
TheArtandScienceofCreatingWell-FittingDentures

Even with modern knowledge about oral health and how to prevent tooth decay and gum disease, more than 25 percent of Americans have lost all their teeth by the time they are 65. Perhaps they did not have access to dental education, quality care or treatment. Whatever the reasons, those who suffer from “edentulism” — the complete loss of all permanent teeth — also suffer from poor self-image, impaired nutrition, and reduced quality of life.

Removable full dentures are often the solution of choice for those suffering from edentulism. Dentures can be made to look good and feel great; but successful denture-wearing demands the collaboration of a skilled dentist and a willing patient.

A set of well-fitting full removable dentures starts with detailed planning. We need to work out where each tooth will be placed and how the upper and lower teeth will meet together. To do this, we make use of photos taken before the teeth were lost, as well as using the facial features as a guide. You as the patient have to decide whether you want your dentures to look much like your natural teeth did, including any gaps and uneven areas, or whether you want to make your new teeth more regular and uniform than the originals.

In addition to the size, spacing and locations of the teeth, decisions must be made regarding the colors and textures of the part of the denture that fits over and looks like gum tissue. Photos can help with this aspect as well. Ridges can be added to the section of the denture behind the upper front teeth to aid in natural speaking and chewing.

The upper and lower dentures must be designed so that in the process of biting they stabilize each other. This is called “balancing the bite.” This is necessary for normal function and speech.

All this careful planning and design are only the beginning. The dentures will be created in a wax form, tested and modified. They are then completed in a dental laboratory, where the new teeth and gums are created out of a special plastic called methyl methacrylate. With careful planning, skill and artistry they are made to look like natural teeth and gums.

At this point the role of the denture wearer becomes vitally important. He or she must relearn how to bite, chew, and speak while wearing the dentures. As the dentures press down on bone and gum tissues, over time some bone will be lost. This will require coming in for frequent checkups and modifications to make sure the dentures continue to fit well and comfortably.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about dentures. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Removable Full Dentures.”