Dr Sadlon's Dental Blog

Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By Sadlon Dentistry
February 15, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
RebuildingYourSmileWithDentalImplants

If you've lost one or more of your teeth due to tooth decay, trauma, gum disease or a failed root canal, there are a variety of ways that our office can help you to restore your smile and increase your confidence. Crowns, conventional bridges and dentures aren't your only options for replacing missing teeth. Dental implants, surgically placed below the gums, are another alternative for replacing missing teeth.

Getting Started: If you would like to explore the option of having dental implants to replace one or more teeth, you will first need a comprehensive exam. The ideal candidate for implants is in good general and oral health. Adequate bone in your jaw is needed to support an implant. Smokers and those with uncontrolled chronic diseases like diabetes may not be good candidates for dental implants because healing may be impaired or slow. In addition, dental implants aren't appropriate for children or teens until their jaw growth is complete.

The Process: Dental implant surgery can be performed in our office using either a local or general anesthetic. The implants actually replace tooth roots; they are placed into the bone surgically. Generally made of commercially pure titanium, this metal has the remarkable ability to fuse with the bone as it heals forming a union known as osseointegration (“osseo” – bone; “integration” – to fuse with). This process takes two to six months depending upon many factors of which bone quality is the most important.

The next step is to place an abutment (a small connector) which attaches the implant to the crown. The crown is the part of the tooth that is normally seen in the mouth above the gums.

Assessment of your individual situation and deciding if dental implants are right for you takes knowledge and experience. Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss any questions you may have regarding dental implants. Read more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Options for Replacing Missing Teeth.”

TestYourKnowledgeFrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutToothWhitening

What causes stains on teeth?

Staining can occur on the outside surfaces of teeth and is caused by foods such as red wine, coffee, and tea, as well as by tobacco use. They can also be developmental, affecting the structure of the teeth due to excessive fluoride levels or from tetracycline antibiotics given during childhood to name a few. Changes in a tooth's enamel or dentin during tooth formation, or as teeth age, can also cause discoloration.

What is going on inside a tooth's structure that makes it look stained?

Most of a tooth's covering (95 percent) is composed of highly mineralized enamel. The crystals of enamel are contained in a framework, or matrix, of organic matter. Dentists believe that various organic compounds that get into this matrix can cause staining.

How do whiteners work?

Tooth whiteners or bleaches expose the teeth to a peroxide compound. This creates reactive oxygen that breaks down highly colored organic compounds within the tooth's sub-surface matrix, making the tooth look whiter, but without changing its internal structure.

What professional in-office whitening techniques are available?

During treatment, a high concentration of peroxide solution in the form of a gel is applied directly on the teeth, often with activation by a heat or light source. These systems use custom tailored trays fitted to an individual's mouth. Silicone barriers or protective gels are used to keep the peroxide gel away from the gums or sensitive membranes in the mouth.

How are professional home whiteners different?

Home whiteners involve a less concentrated solution of peroxide in a gel form. It is delivered to the tooth surface by a bleaching tray that is custom-made in your dentist's office. Over-the-counter whiteners such as whitening strips or paint-on formulas can also be used, but they take longer and they're not as effective — the more diluted solutions are used for safety.

Can toothpastes really whiten teeth?

Mild abrasives in toothpastes clean surface stains but cannot change the underlying tooth color or remove significant staining.

How long do the results last?

Usually, the results last from six months to two years, but effects will diminish over time. You can make them last longer by avoiding the foods and habits that cause staining.

Are teeth whiteners safe to use?

Teeth whitening products are safe if used according to our recommendations or the product manufacturer's directions. Peroxide products may be toxic if used in excess of recommended intervals and amounts.

Read more about teeth whitening in the article “Teeth Whitening, Brighter, Lighter, Whiter...” Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss whether tooth whitening is right for you.

SmileMakeoversmdashPlanningForYourWedding

Of major importance in all wedding day plans is to ensure that you have your special day captured on film. And it is that fact that influences most brides and grooms to take a long and hard look in the mirror to observe their smiles. Not only do wedding dates motivate many brides and grooms to address concerns regarding their smile, it also serves as the perfect time for their parents to pursue their smile makeover dreams so that they too feel good about themselves in your wedding photos.

A proper smile makeover should have a two-fold design plan that ensures you obtain optimal functionality and oral health while creating the cosmetic look you want. Starting with the basics, a thorough dental cleaning is the least expensive way to remove stains and freshen both your smile and breath. We will also use this consultation to learn about your concerns, goals, expectations, and wedding day timeline to create the action plan for future treatments in reaching your smile makeover goals. You may also want to discuss whitening your teeth during your appointment, as whitening teeth is an effective way to brighten your smile a few shades in as few as 1 to 2 appointments plus whitening while at home.

If your smile makeover is a bit more challenging, relax. There are a wide variety of tools and techniques available that include bonding, veneers, crowns, bridges, and dental implants for restoring your smile. Or we may work closely with a specialist such as an orthodontist to straighten your teeth or a periodontist for periodontal plastic surgery that can alter your gum tissues and their relationship with your teeth. The most important tip to remember is to schedule your first dental appointment soon after you become engaged so that you have plenty of time prior to the big day to attain your picture perfect wedding day smile.

Want to learn more?

Contact us today to discuss your smile makeover questions or to schedule an appointment. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor article, “Planning Your Wedding Day Smile.”

By Sadlon Dentistry
January 05, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dentures  
GettingtheBestPossibleResultswithFullDentures

Even with all the medical know-how we possess at the dawn of the 21st century, complete tooth loss is still a big problem. In this country, more than a quarter of all adults between ages 65 and 74 have lost all of their teeth. For these individuals, removable full dentures are often still used as an affordable and effective way to replace missing teeth.

Success with dentures originates from a collaboration among dentist, laboratory technician, and, of course, the denture-wearer. Creating false teeth that look natural is as much an art as it is a science. We take a number of steps to make sure you will get the best results. These include:

  • Positioning the teeth. Using facial landmarks and photographs of how you used to look before your teeth were lost helps us determine where to place each tooth and how the upper and lower teeth should line up in relation to each other. For example, we will consider what size the teeth should be; how close to the lip they should be; and how much space should exist between the upper and lower teeth when they are at rest.
  • Simulating natural gums. If you are someone with a “high lip dynamic” (a lot of gum shows when you smile), it is particularly important to simulate real gum tissue in a set of full dentures. Fortunately, there are many colors and textures available to create a realistic effect. Again, photographs can be helpful in achieving this.
  • Balancing the bite. We must make sure that your upper and lower dentures come together in a way that facilitates normal biting, chewing, and speech.

As a denture wearer, you will need to visit our office regularly to make sure the gum tissue and bone upon which your dentures rest stay healthy. It's common to see a gradual loss of bone in people who wear dentures at a rate that varies from person to person. This bone loss can affect the fit of your dentures and lead to other health problems, which we can address if we are monitoring you on an ongoing basis.

If you have any questions about dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Removable Full Dentures.”

By Sadlon Dentistry
December 29, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral health   root canal  
RootCanalPainmdashDoYouKnowTheSymptoms

Nearly everyone has either said or heard the expression, “I'd rather have a root canal...” when comparing worst-case scenarios. However, this comparison is a common myth for a treatment that is typically successful with little to no pain. In fact, the pain associated with a root canal problem occurs prior to treatment and is relieved by it, not visa versa.

To begin with, let's define what root canal treatment is as well as the field of dentistry that specializes in it. Endodontics (“endo” – inside; “dont” – tooth) is the branch of dentistry that addresses problems affecting a tooth's root or nerve. It is dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the root canals of the teeth. The canals inside the tooth roots contain the living tissues called the dental pulp, which also contain the nerves of the teeth. When the pulp inside a problematic tooth becomes inflamed or infected it responds by becoming painful, and pain is a warning sign of a problem. The nature of the symptoms can define the character of the pain and the problem. They include the following:

  • Sharp, acute pain that is difficult to pinpoint
  • Intense pain that occurs when biting down on the tooth or food
  • Lingering pain after eating either hot or cold foods
  • Dull ache and pressure
  • Tenderness accompanied by swelling in the nearby gums

Each of these different categories of pain signify a different problem, but all are related to root canal issues. Nevertheless, you should contact us today (before your condition worsens) to schedule an appointment. And to learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatments for a root canal, read the article “I'd Rather Have A Root Canal....”